Immunization prevents deadly diseases, deaths: Facts

Immunization prevents deadly diseases, deaths: Facts

why immunization is important in protecting children’s health, why immunization is important for infants, why is vaccination important for babies, why is immunization important for older adults, why is immunization important in healthcare system, why is vaccination important to the community, reasons why vaccination is important, explain why vaccination is important

Why immunization is important

The nature has given space to billions of human, providing all the resources that they need to live a healthy and happy life. However, it’s human who have been never satisfied since the beginning of the civilization. They always want more, and keep destroying the nature for their ridiculously ambitious and materialistic goals. Amid all this undesirable wrestling with the environment, human has even devastated natural immunization, and gave way to several epidemics, pandemics and diseases so far.

With growing threat to the natural immunization when situation seemed to be going out of hands, we needed medical immunization to save the humanity. This was the time when vaccination came into existence, later creating greatest success stories. Immunization and vaccination has proven to be one of the most valuable discoveries of medical science history so far. The process has saved millions from increasing threats of infectious, cancerous and other chronic diseases, evading their potential disabilities, disorders, and deaths.

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I am sick

Immunization prevents life-threatening diseases

The list of vaccine-preventable diseases is long, and immunization has significantly declined illness, death, and transmission of these diseases worldwide. Vaccine-preventable diseases include Diphtheria, Haemophilus influenzae Type B (Hib), Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B, Herpes Zoster (Shingles), Human Papillomavirus (HPV), Pandemic Influenza, Measles, Meningococcal Disease, and Mumps. Nonetheless, there are more in list, including Influenza, Pertussis (Whooping Cough), Pneumococcal Disease, Polio, Rotavirus, Rubella, Tetanus (Lockjaw), Varicella (Chickenpox).

Every disease was nightmares before the development of counter vaccine. Influenza and pneumonia have been life-threatening not only in children, but among top 10 causes of death of older adults. With the efforts of the international humanitarian body United Nations, child immunization process has become a normal custom globally. However, in many low-income countries, there is still need for more awareness programmes and assistance about vaccination of children. Furthermore, there are a number of researches in progress across the world to provide more effective immunizations.

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We are saved

Progress: Child vaccination vs Seniors vaccination

According to a UN report, an estimated 116.3 million or nearly 86 percent children under one year globally received three doses of diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP3) in 2019. However, around 19.7 million children could not receive basic vaccines during the year. As many as 125 nations had reached at least 90 percent of vaccination coverage of DTP3 vaccine in 2019. An estimated 60 percent of children who did not receive vaccines live in 10 countries – Angola, Brazil, DR Congo, Ethiopia, India, Indonesia, Nigeria, Pakistan, Philippines and Viet Nam.

Immunization of seniors, however, is not yet a big trend though the vaccines have helped many from influenza. But pneumonia still remains among the most lethal infections, annually killing a number of people, including women and elderly ones. Immunization is very important for seniors aged over 65 as they are at high risk of vaccine-preventable sicknesses. This is because of aging-related immune function and chronic medical comorbidity. But despite extensively recognized practice guidelines, their vaccination rate is still low.

Know 10 facts on why immunization is important

  • Most children get lifesaving vaccines to avoid infectious diseases causing serious illness or disability.
  • Vaccination prevents 4-5 million annual deaths, larger global coverage can prevent 1.5 million more.
  • Vaccination provides defence against antimicrobial resistance disease caused by drug-resistant bacteria.
  • Vaccine research & development makes good progress in preventing malaria, tuberculosis, Ebola.
  • In Africa, vaccination drastically reduces Meningitis A that causes severe brain damage and death.
  • Mortality from highly contagious, deadly disease Measles has went down worldwide by 73 percent.
  • 90 countries, home to nearly 33 percent girls, are using HPV vaccine against cervical cancer.
  • Highly infectious disease causing paralysis, Polio is on the edge with 85 percent infants fully vaccinated.
  • Immunization eliminates maternal and neonatal tetanus in South-east Asia, Americas and Europe.
  • Vaccination is the major arm to battle with pandemics, like Covid-19, which take millions of lives.

why immunization is important in protecting children’s health, why immunization is important for infants, why is vaccination important for babies, why is immunization important for older adults, why is immunization important in healthcare system, why is vaccination important to the community, reasons why vaccination is important, explain why vaccination is important

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